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Nursing Home Neglect Archives

Getting help when you suspect elder abuse

Although many people do not like to think about it, the reality is that as life expectancy improves because of better medical care some people may eventually require long-term care. Furthermore, the U.S. demographics are changing. Baby boomers are expected to enter retirement and potentially require long-term care in the near future. Thus, it is very important to have a basic understanding of what elder abuse is, individual rights, how to recognize elder abuse and potential legal options.

Who addresses elder abuse after it is reported?

As people retire and age, they may be concered with who will care for them when they can no longer care for themselves. Thus, it may be helpful for our Connecticut residents to be aware of who to call or what steps to take if one suspects that an elder, whether it is a family member or friend, is being abused. If one suspects elder abuse is occurring, it is important to call the Connecticut Department of Social Services to report the abuse.

Things to think about when selecting a nursing home

Though many people do not want to think about a nursing home for a loved one, there are times when it may not be possible to adequately care for and meet the medical needs of a family member. This could be due to their advanced age, illness or an injury which requires medical care.

Understanding elder abuse and its signs

As most people age, their physical, mental and health faculties decline and they may need help to perform daily activities such as eating, drinking and getting around. Elderly persons are a vulnerable population and sadly many older people are frequently abused, neglected and/or exploited by their caregivers. Their caregiver can be a family member, a friend or someone that the elderly person trusts. Elder abuse can be inflicted by both men and women. Thus, it is important for everyone to know what the signs of elder abuse are.

What you should know about elder abuse

Most of us know an elderly family member or friend. However, despite knowing an elderly person, most people likely are not aware of what elder abuse is and the statistics surrounding it. Connecticut residents may find it interesting to learn that according to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2010, persons aged 90 and above were estimated to number around two million.

What you should know about nursing home neglect

Connecticut residents may not find it surprising to learn that the well-established medical and public health infrastructure in the United States has drastically increased life expectancy. According to the CDC, in 2012 there were over 43 million persons aged 65 and older in the country. This demographic of older persons is expected to rapidly grow mainly due to the baby-boomer generation, those born between 1946 and 1964, turning 65.

Am I a mandated reporter of elder abuse?

Connecticut residents who have a loved one in a nursing home or long-term care facility will find it helpful to know that in the State of Connecticut, all licensed health care providers are legislatively mandated to report any suspected acts of abuse, neglect or exploitation against certain vulnerable groups. These groups include children, people with disabilities, those living in long-term care facilities and our elder population.

How common is it to suffer injuries or harm in a nursing home?

It is estimated that nearly 40 percent of people who are over the age of 65 will at some point in their lives spend some time in a nursing home. Keeping that estimate in mind, our readers will find it alarming to learn that according to a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which primarily focused on skilled nursing care, found that nearly 22 percent of the patients at such facilities suffered some kind of long-lasting harm while another 11 percent suffered some kind of temporary harm. Additionally, the study found that nearly 1.5 percent of the patients lost their lives in such facilities due to substandard care.

What you need to know about elder abuse

Aging is an inevitable progression of life. Particularly as baby boomers enter retirement, the number of older Americans is expected to increase, and pose new challenges. Most of us know a family member who is an elderly person and given their age, health status, mental status and more may have legitimate concerns about their safety. Sadly, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse, which is a division Department of Human and Health Services administration on aging, elder abuse is on the rise. But, many wonder as to what elder abuse is and who is affected?

Caregiver facing charges for alleged elder abuse

Aging is an evitable fact of life. As people age, many face a decline in physical and mental health. In some cases, elderly people may need constant care and family members may not be equipped to care for the elderly person. Thankfully, there are options such as assisted living facilities and in-care home to help the elderly receive the care they need. Families hope that these options will allow their loved ones to get the compassionate care and attention they need.

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Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney P.C.
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Bridgeport, CT 06604

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