Dog bites are more common and more of a risk than you might think. Often, dog bites in Connecticut occur with a familiar dog. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, around five million dog bites occur every year. In general, dog bites are also more likely to happen to children. In fact, the majority of dog bites to children will occur in the home. The concern over dog bites goes beyond the initial injury. Animal bites can be prone to infection, especially in children and those who are immunocompromised.

Bacteria in the dog’s mouth transfers to the bite wound. Bite wounds can affect more than the upper layer of skin. They can affect the deeper structures, such as tendons, bones and joints. Deeper injuries occur more often on the hands or feet of a person. These limbs are easier for dogs to injure more severely. If a dog has any foreign bodies, such as soil on its teeth, these can also transfer to the wound. When soil transfers into the bite wound, tetanus may be a concern. Some dog bites may require vaccines afterwards.

Dog bites need meticulous cleaning and irrigation to reduce infection. If you suffer a bite wound on your hand, you may be at a higher risk of infection due to the bacteria on your skin. Bite wounds to the face, however, have less of a chance of infection. This is due to the vascular supply and because people who suffer facial wounds are more likely to seek medical attention.

The information provided is to educate on the dangers of dog bites. It is not legal advice.