We Help After an Accident or Abuse

The personal injury attorneys of Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney have recovered more than $500 million in verdicts and settlements. Est 1960.

We Help After an Accident or Abuse

We Help After an Accident or Abuse

The personal injury attorneys of Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney have recovered more than $500 million in verdicts and settlements. Est 1960.

We are open and ready to help…

We have modified our office to help with social distancing. We are able to see clients inside or outside the office, or by video or telephone conference.

Courts are beginning to reopen, and insurance companies are resuming normal business. We are here for you and happy to help with insurance issues, medical bills and everything else.

We are open and ready to help…
We have modified our office to help with social distancing. We are able to see clients inside or outside the office, or by video or telephone conference.
Courts are beginning to reopen, and insurance companies are resuming normal business. We are here for you and happy to help with insurance issues, medical bills and everything else.

Over $70 Million

Awards and settlements collected for child victims of sexual abuse across Connecticut involving priests, clergy, teachers, coaches and family members.

$6.2Million

Landmark verdict holding an off-duty police officer responsible for failing to prevent a fatal drunk driving accident.

$6Million

Recovered award for family after proving the medical manufacturer knew about the faulty oxygen machine that killed a patient.

$5.39Million

Won settlement for truck accident victim by taking the case before the superior court after trucking company filed for bankruptcy.

$2.1Million

Largest verdict in Connecticut history involving serious injuries after a motorcycle accident.

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Personal Injury
  4.  » 
  5. Car Accidents
  6.  » After a car accident, insurance companies usually lowball

People injured in a Connecticut car collision will often receive a settlement offer from the insurance company to preclude what can be an exponentially costly legal battle. In many of these cases, either the person will accept the offer, not realizing how badly they were injured, or they will mistakenly believe that the offer is the most they can get. For those who receive an offer and believe that it is too low, there are certain steps to take to try and decide how best to proceed.

The insurance claims adjuster is there to save as much money for the company as possible. With that, the injured person needs to conduct an analysis of the offer. The insurance company might not have all the necessary information to come to a reasonable amount. There could be a belief that the injured person was guilty of contributory negligence. Alternatively, it might be a time-tested negotiating tactic, just to see if the person takes the offer.

When there is an offer, the person should formulate a written response. In some cases, the company just does not have all the necessary documentation, and it can be solved by providing it. The insurer could be influenced by a written reply as it puts a face on the person who was hurt and suffered property damage. Since the insurer might be willing to negotiate, there is nothing wrong with presenting a counteroffer. It might be hard to believe, but there could be some middle ground to settle.

Finally, there is the option to take the insurance company to court. It can be a negotiating tactic on its own, or an actual threat. Insurance companies generally prefer to stay out of court to avoid lawyer’s fees. However, going to court always presents a risk that the injured will lose and end up with little or nothing.

After a car accident, the amount that was lost can vary, depending on vehicle damage, medical bills and many other factors. An offer from the insurance company can be confusing. For those who believe that an offer was too low or enough, speaking to an experienced attorney can help.

Source: Injury.FindLaw.com, “When the Car Insurance Settlement Offer is Too Low,” accessed on May 2, 2017