When it comes to the topic of distracted driving and related car accidents, many of our Connecticut residents may erroneously presume that a cell phone is somehow involved in all distracted driving accidents. However, it is interesting to note that distracted driving is not limited to just phone use or texting and driving. It encompasses numerous distractions which affect both first -time drivers, such as teens and adults, alike. However, teens are more likely to involved.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that teenagers between 16 and 19 are nearly three times more likely to be involved in a fatal motor vehicle accident than drivers older than 19 years of age. CDC estimates that seven teens lose their lives daily as a result of injuries they suffered in a car accident. Our Connecticut residents may find it interesting to learn that following a recent study published in the Journal of Transportation Safety & Security further highlighted the issue of teen distracted driving.

This study found that nearly 27 percent of teenage drivers indicated that while driving a car, they have done things such as swap out their clothes, change their shoes, put on make-up, removed and put in contact lens and even done their homework. Research has shown that taking away one’s attention from the primary task of driving for even a couple of second’s results in a dramatic increased risk of being involved in a car accident.

Most people do not think of the consequence of taking one’s eyes off the road even for a second or two. But, those few seconds can be life-changing. Distracted driving accidents have garnered a lot of attention lately and many states, including Connecticut, have enacted laws to prevent distracted driving accidents. Though Connecticut has a general law in place against all distracted driving, car accidents stemming from distracted driving unfortunately still occur all too often. Anyone who has suffered injuries in a car accident may find it beneficial to speak with a personal injury lawyer.

Source: Medical Daily, “Forget Texting And Driving, Teen Drivers Distract Themselves With Other Things Too,” Anthony Rivas, March 21, 2015