We Help After an Accident or Abuse

The personal injury attorneys of Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney have recovered more than $500 million in verdicts and settlements. Est 1960.

We Help After an Accident or Abuse

We Help After an Accident or Abuse

The personal injury attorneys of Tremont Sheldon Robinson Mahoney have recovered more than $500 million in verdicts and settlements. Est 1960.

We are open and ready to help…

We have modified our office to help with social distancing. We are able to see clients inside or outside the office, or by video or telephone conference.

Courts are beginning to reopen, and insurance companies are resuming normal business. We are here for you and happy to help with insurance issues, medical bills and everything else.

We are open and ready to help…
We have modified our office to help with social distancing. We are able to see clients inside or outside the office, or by video or telephone conference.
Courts are beginning to reopen, and insurance companies are resuming normal business. We are here for you and happy to help with insurance issues, medical bills and everything else.

Over $70 Million

Awards and settlements collected for child victims of sexual abuse across Connecticut involving priests, clergy, teachers, coaches and family members.

$6.2Million

Landmark verdict holding an off-duty police officer responsible for failing to prevent a fatal drunk driving accident.

$6Million

Recovered award for family after proving the medical manufacturer knew about the faulty oxygen machine that killed a patient.

$5.39Million

Won settlement for truck accident victim by taking the case before the superior court after trucking company filed for bankruptcy.

$2.1Million

Largest verdict in Connecticut history involving serious injuries after a motorcycle accident.

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  4.  » Former teacher facing a charge of sexual assault of a 17-year-old

Teacher and professors are generally held in high esteem, serve as role models and typically students look up to them, trust them and seek guidance from them. Thus, when the trusted and respected teacher-student bond is violated or broken the consequences on the community and the person are devastating. Connecticut residents may find it interesting to learn that in July 2014 a 36-year-old English teacher and former Southern Connecticut State University adjunct professor was arrested and charged with second degree sexual assault of a 17-year-old girl.

According to reports, the 36-year-old was arrested in front of his students while he was teaching at SCSU. Authorities were alerted about the alleged sexual assault incident after the superintendent of the Ledyard High School informed them regarding a possible inappropriate sexual relationship between a female student and teacher during the 2013-2014 school year.

The 36-year-old teacher allegedly emailed the 17-year-old student and shared personal matters with her. At some point the relationship turned sexual and he had intercourse with the girl both at the high school and at his home. When the 17-year-old victim of sexual assault tried to end the relationship, the 36-year-old teacher threatened to harm himself. Nevertheless, the student was able to end the relationship and allegedly found a note in a book from the 36-year-old apologizing to her for letting their relationship turn sexual in nature.

Following his arrest, the 36-year-old was charged with second degree sexual assault of a 17-year-old. Under CT General Statute, a charge of second degree sexual assault includes sexual contact between a student and a school employee. It is a felony level charge, and if convicted it carries a minimum of nine months in prison. Though the matter is being dealt with in criminal court, a person who has sexually abused as a child may also be held financially liable for the injuries they caused to child victim. Contacting an attorney familiar with the intricacies of sexual abuse and assault civil cases may be helpful.

Source: New Haven Register, “Ex-SCSU instructor accused of sex with high school student,” Brian Charles, October 30, 2014